Answering Most Common Questions About Ten-Year Green Cards

Answering Most Common Questions About Ten-Year Green Cards

The pathway to American citizenship includes obtaining a ten-year green card. Understandable, as you are on your journey to citizenship, you may have questions about ten-year green cards. Immigration can be an overwhelming, stressful, and complicated process. However, it’s crucial that you have an experienced immigration attorney who can answer questions and help navigate your way through the immigration process.

Common question about ten-year green cards

Our New Jersey immigration law firm is providing you with the most common questions about ten-year green cards.

If you need additional guidance in obtaining your green card or have questions, our immigration law firm in New Jersey can help you reach your American dream. We work with clients locally, nationwide, and internationally.

What is a green card?

A ten-year green card, also commonly known as a green card or permanent resident green card, is issued for anyone who has gained residency through an employer or your spouse (been married longer than 2 years, parent, or relative has been issued a green card. You can also receive a green card by filing a self-petition through VAWA or other humanitarian pathways such as U visa, T visa, Special Immigrant Juvenile Status or ASYLUM.

Who is eligible for a ten-year green card?

The following people are eligible for a ten-year green card:

Immediate relatives of U.S. citizens, such as spouses, children, and parents. Certain relatives of lawful permanent residents, such as siblings and adult children. This also includes certain refugees, asylees, and victims of domestic abuse who self-petition through VAWA, U visa, T visa or Special Immigrant Juvenile Status.

How do I apply for a ten-year green card?

The application process for a ten-year green card varies depending on the category under which you are eligible. However, all applicants must file Form I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status.

What are the fees for a ten-year green card?

The filing fee for Form I-485 is currently as of 2023 $1,140. There is also a biometric fee of $85, which must be paid separately.

Will I have a green card interview?

Yes, you will likely have a green card interview. However, USCIS has the prerogative to waive these interviews.   A Green Card interview is so USCIS can meet the applicant in person to verify that the applicant is eligible to become a permanent resident and that all of the information on their application is valid. This interview is usually the final step of the Green Card application and typically happens 7 to 15 months after filing.

This article can help you prepare for your interview, and you can also download our free immigration guide with the most popular questions to help you with your green card interview.

How long does it take to get a ten-year green card?

The processing time for a ten-year green card can vary depending on the USCIS office where your application is being processed. However, it is generally several months to a year.

What are the benefits of having a ten-year green card?

Green card holders enjoy many benefits, including the right to:

  • Live and work permanently in the United States
  • Travel freely in and out of the United States
  • Apply for U.S. citizenship after five years (three years if married to a U.S. citizen or through an approved humanitarian petition such as VAWA)
  • Sponsor family members for green cards
  • Receive federal and state benefits, such as Social Security and Medicare

However, green card holders have several responsibilities, including:

  • Obey all U.S. laws
  • Pay U.S. taxes
  • Maintain a permanent residence in the United States.

Can I lose my ten-year green card?

Yes, you can lose your ten-year green card if you:

  • Commit a serious crime
  • Abandon your permanent residence in the United States, or you are out of the United States for more than 1 (one) year.
  • Fail to maintain your eligibility for permanent residency.

What is the difference between a ten-year green card and a two-year green card?

A two-year green card is a green card that is valid for two years. The actual name is a two-year conditional green card. Some refer to this type of green card as a temporary green card. A two-year green card is issued when you have residency through a marriage that is less than two years old.

A ten-year green card is issued for anyone who has gained residency through an employer or your spouse (been married longer than 2 years, parent, or relative has been issued a green card. You can also receive a ten year green card by filing a self-petition through VAWA or other humanitarian relief.

A ten-year permanent resident green card is good for ten years. You will need to reapply for your ten-year green card every ten years. You should start the process of reapplying for your ten-year green card a few months before your green card expires.You can learn more about two-year and ten-year green cards by reading this article.

We can help you reach your American dream and help you obtain your green card.

If you have any additional questions about immigration or are looking for immigration services, don’t hesitate to contact the Odunlami Law Firm at 973-993-1900 or support@odunlamilaw.com.

Areas of Immigration Law:

  • Naturalization (Citizenship) Application
  • Immigrant Relative Petitions
  • Fiancé Visa Applications
  • Adjustment of Status and Consular Processing
  • Criminal Consequences and Deportation Defense
  • Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) Application
  • Special Immigrant Juvenile Status
  • Green Card Renewals
  • Temporary Work Visas
  • Temporary Protected Status
  • Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals
  • Waivers
  • Deportation

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